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MONTPELIER CRESCENT, BRIGHTON
Architect: Amon Henry Wilds, 1843 - 1847

Panorama

montpelier crescent, brighton

LEWES CRESCENT, BRIGHTON
Architects: Wilds and Busby, 1823 - 1828

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lewes crescent, brighton

ROYAL CRESCENT, BRIGHTON

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royal crescent, brighton

A showcase of some of Brighton's Squares.
 

brunswick square, hove

BRUNSWICK SQUARE, HOVE
Architects: Wilds & Busby,1825


Panoramas (2)
 

adelaide crescent, hove

ADELAIDE CRESCENT and PALMEIRA SQUARE, HOVE
Architects: Decimus Burton, 1830, and completed later, by others.

Panoramas (3)
 

bedford square, brighton

BEDFORD SQUARE, BRIGHTON
The first of Brighton's Squares, 1801

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The Bandstand

jubilee square, brighton

BRIGHTON'S NEW LIBRARY & SQUARE

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POWIS SQUARE, BRIGHTON

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powis square, brighton
bartholomews square, brighton

BARTHOLOMEW'S, BRIGHTON

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clarence square, brighton

CLARENCE SQUARE, BRIGHTON


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russell square, brighton

RUSSELL SQUARE, BRIGHTON


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regency square, brighton

REGENCY SQUARE, BRIGHTON

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BRIGHTON SQUARE, BRIGHTON


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For views of this area before the Square, click here

norfolk square, brighton

NORFOLK SQUARE, BRIGHTON


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hanover crescent, brighton

HANOVER CRESCENT, BRIGHTON


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western terrace, brighton

WESTERN TERRACE AND WESTERN PAVILION, BRIGHTON

 

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old steine, brighton

OLD STEINE, BRIGHTON

 

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For a view of the Old Steine as it was ...

oriental place, brighton

ORIENTAL PLACE, BRIGHTON

 

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New Steine, Brighton

NEW STEINE, BRIGHTON

 

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brighton square, brighton

Designed by the partnership of Charles Busby and Amon Wilds, the Brunswick Estate was built between 1824 and 1828.
It comprised all the elements of a self-contained town, with a market building (which later became a riding school) and houses and mews for support staff to the First Rate houses.

It is not easy, in 2014, to fully understand the impact of this very small square in 1966. Formed out of derelict land and buildings, it provided a focus for the narrow pathways of the Lanes, as well as presenting a number of new shops, a restaurant and residential flats. Although the detailing may seem, to our eyes now, somewhat coarse, at the time there was a refreshing simplicity about the whole scheme; the Square was, of course, without the more recent central fountain and the clutter of chairs and tables – views may differ upon the success of these later introductions.
It gained a number of design awards upon its completion, and was upheld as a fine example of urban planning.

Architects: Fitzroy Robinson & Partners.

The first ten houses were built to the design of Decimus Burton in 1830, with the intention of forming a crescent; this plan was never realised and construction was halted in 1834.
When it re–commenced in 1849 the concept had changed to a form more reminiscent of Lewes Crescent and Sussex Square in Kemp Town, albeit with the more robust detailing of the age.
Completed in the 1860s.