CHURCH OF ST HELEN, HANGLETON

 

Panoramas (4)

Detail of 13/14th century wall painting

A brief history ...

sthelens

The oldest surviving building in Brighton and Hove. Known to have existed in 1093, it was the parish church of Hangleton, a downland village that probably fell victim to the Black Death.While the Victorian urge to improve and modernise has changed the character of many old churches, St Helen's remains largely in character with its foundation.
Beauty in simplicity.

st bartholomew's church brighton
annunciation
st bartholomews chuch, brighton
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A showcase of some of the fine religious architecture of Brighton.
 

all saints church, hove

ALL SAINTS CHURCH, HOVE
Architect: J.L.Pearson, 1891



Panoramas (6)

st peters church, brighton

ST PETERS CHURCH, BRIGHTON
Architect: Charles Barry, 1824 -1828
Panoramas (3)

View of nave, 1971, showning reredos by W.H.Randall Blacking, destroyed by arson, September 1985

Detail of reredos
 

ST BARTHOLOMEW'S CHURCH, BRIGHTON
Architect: Edmund Scott, 1874
 

Panoramas (2)
High resolution image of silverwork by Henry Wilson (Flash) (iPad)


 

st nicholas church, brighton

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH, BRIGHTON
Possibly 14th. century, reconstructed 1853, architect: R.C.Carpenter

Panorama, prior to restoration of wall paintings

Panoramas - September 2009, showing the restored wallpaintings, and exteriors (5)

High resolution image of the restored painting to the chancel arch (flash) (iPad)

High resolution image of the Norman font (flash) (iPad)

High resolution image of the restored painting to the west wall (flash) (iPad)

High resolution image of glass by R C Carpenter originally in this church,
now in Church of the Annunciation (flash)
(iPad)

 

st marys church, kemp town

ST MARYS CHURCH, KEMPTOWN, BRIGHTON
Architect: W. Emerson, 1877

Panoramas (5)

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The Church of All Saints, Eaton Road - the Parish Church of Hove - was designed by J. L. Pearson in 1892 (and completed, but without the planned tower, in 1901). The vicarage had been completed in 1883, and the pair of buildings represent the finest Victorian architecture in Hove. The style of the church is 13th. century Gothic. Grade1 Listed.

Architect: Charles Barry.(who also designed St Andrews, Hove, and, later, The Houses of Parliament) 1825-8, with extensive enlargement by Somers Clarke, 1898-1902.
Built as a Chapel of Ease to the Church of St. Nicholas, it is one of the earliest Perpendicular Revival Churches in England.
In 1873, following the division of the town's parishes, it was designated as the
Parish Church.
In 2007, faced with insuperable maintenance costs, the PPC voted to close the Church.
In 2009, steps were taken to rescind this measure.

This building, most famous of Arthur Wagner's churches, was designed by local architect Edmund Scott and completed in 1874.The highest parish church in the country, it caused controversy at the time of its building, due to its design and also due to the nature of service and the teachings of the Oxford Movement, supported by Wagner.
Magnificent decorations added by Henry Wilson from 1895 - 1910.
In regular use both for religious service and for concerts.

Originally of 14th.century foundation and the Parish Church of Brighton, it was enlarged in 1852, in part as a memorial to the Duke of Wellington, by Rev. Henry Wagner.
Architect, Richard C. Carpenter. The church has an outstanding Norman font.
Wallpaintings (1890-2) and stained glass by Charles Kempe.
Screen of late 15th.century origin, restored 19th.century

This site was originally occupied by a church in the classical style by A.H.Wilds. Following a collapse of roof and walls, it was rebuilt with red sandstone and terracotta dressings in a style reminiscent of the French Gothic by William Emerson, 1877-1879. A superb interior.

middle street synagogue,brighton

MIDDLE STREET SYNAGOGUE
Architect: T. Lainson 1875

Panoramas (5)

The Middle Street Synagogue was designed by Thomas Lainson (who also designed the Children's' Hospital in Dyke Road, the Bristol Road Methodist Church, KempTown, and the Repository in Holland Road, Hove) in 1875. Originally somewhat plain internally, the building was gradually enriched by philanthropists to its present polychromatic state. Listed Grade II*.

st michael & all angels church, brighton

ST MICHAEL AND ALL ANGELS, BRIGHTON
Architects: G.F. Bodley, 1862, & W. Burges, 1868

Panoramas (7)

St Michael's embodies the Victorian enthusiasm for church building; the first church of 1862, that has become the south aisle of the enlarged whole, was designed by G. F. Bodley, and ornamented with windows by Morris & Co., with a painted ceiling to the sanctuary by Morris & Webb. The enlargement by William Burges, designed in 1868, was finally completed after Burges' death, in 1895

st paul church, west street, brighton

ST PAULS, WEST STREET, BRIGHTON
Architect: R.C.Carpenter,1848

Panoramas (6)


High resolution image of stained glass (Flash) (iPad)
 

The first of the Brighton churches to promote the catholic revival of the Oxford Movement.
Funded by Henry Wagner, with his son Arthur as the first vicar, it was designed by
Richard C. Carpenter and completed in 1848.
It was to have had a stone spire, but the existing timber one was added by Arthur Wagner in 1873.
Stained glass by Pugin and by Kempe.

st andrews church, waterloo street, brighton

ST ANDREW'S, WATERLOO STREET, HOVE
Architect: Charles Barry, 1827


Panoramas (5)

Designed by Charles Barry and built by Rev. Edward Everard as the Chapel of Ease for Brunswick Town; the first Italianate style church in England and contemporary with Barry's Gothick design for St Peter's, Brighton. No longer used for regular worship, but in the care of Friends who maintain it, and keep it open for visitors.
They have done a remarkably fine job.

french protestant church, brighton

FRENCH PROTESTANT CHURCH, QUEENSBURY MEWS, BRIGHTON
Architect: J. G. Gibbins 1887
Closed 2008

 

Panoramas (2)

 

A brief history.

french protestant church, brighton

A simple chapel for the French Protestant community.

Closed in 2008.

CHURCH OF THE ANNUNCIATION, WASHINGTON STREET, BRIGHTON
Architect: William Dancy 1864


Panoramas (5)

High resolution image of the glass by Burne-Jones (flash) (iPad)

High resolution image of the glass by R C Carpenter (previously in St Nicholas) (Flash) (iPad)

Founded by Arthur Douglas Wagner and designed by William Dancy, this church was opened on The Feast of the Assumption [15 August]1864.
It was seen as a Mission Church to "... bring the light of faith and education to the poor", in contrast to the fashionable Brighton churches that served 'the carriage trade'.
The sloping land had previously been market gardens, but the rapid expansion of the town produced housing for the working poor who laboured in fishing, farming and the railway works.The difficult site allowed a school to be located beneath the church, a function that it retains today.The church is orientated on a West - East axis, which was to have been rectified when a planned school for girls was built; however, it seems that the congregation enjoyed the status quo and the necessary enlargement took place as we see today. The glass to the west [liturgical east] is by William Morris, designed by Burne-Jones, while that to the east is by R C Carpenter (1853), and was originally installed in St Nicholas's Church, but removed when that church was enlarged.